Christina Kim

Christina KimAnimated.  flamboyant, outgoing, colorful, successful.  Depression?

The Golf Channel called me to be the still photographer on the set of  LPGA’s Christina Kim’s appearance on InPlay with Jimmy Roberts.  Damon Hack was the show host.

The interview took place at ChampionsGate, a golf resort in Orlando, Florida.  Two adjoining rooms were set up with monitors, make up, cameras and lighting.

On camera with Damon Hack, Christina spoke about her successes, upbringing, family, style and golf. She also spoke of her depression, which she wrote about in her blog last year. Her good friend Michelle Wei also stopped by the set, and spoke about her relationship with Christina.  It was cool to be in the room with two of the games superstars.

Off camera, Christina took an interest in my Canon 5DMarkIII camera, and said she loves photography.

On the way to the next location to hit golf balls, I asked Christina if she had a minute to pose for a quick photo.  (Above)  Hotel staff was setting up some “grass” covered chairs for an event later in the day, and I simply thought it looked cool.

After a few jokes on the way back to her vehicle, Christina was on her way.  It was a great experience with one of golfs brightest stars.

Follow Christina Kim on Twitter and Instagram @THECHRISTINAKIM

Follow Cy Cyr on Twitter and on Instagram @sportsphotographer

Raymond Floyd

Raymond Floyd

Raymond Floyd won two majors before I was born.  He won another two after I was born.  He has 22 wins on the PGA Tour.

The Golf Channel filmed a “7 Nights at the Academy” special show at Old Palm Golf Club in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida featuring Raymond Floyd.  Filming took place over two days on the range facility.

Golf Channel’s Martin Hall co-hosted the show.  Win McMurry took a behind the scenes crew through the show, and even hosted a Q and A with Mr. Floyd.

My photos were used to promote the show online, in banner ads, and on the Golf Channel website.

Mr. Floyd was great to work with, as we had conversations about his children, New England states, fishing and hunting.

Shaquille O'Neal

Shaquille O’Neal

Shaquille O'Neal

The first time I met Shaquille O’Neal was while assisting a photographer for Sports Illustrated many years ago.  We rolled up to Shaq’s front door in the exclusive gated community of Islesworth in Orlando, Florida, and the big man himself answered the door.  He was massive.  Shaking his hand was like holding a box of tissues.

I had just watched the MTV Cribs episode that features his massive home featuring a basketball court, insanely deep swimming pool, lake home, cars and staff.

The last time I photographed Shaq was for the 2012 March Madness advertisements for Dove Men + Care.  A production company filmed him on a green screen in his garage, and I was the set photographer.   Shaq shared early life stories from growing up, and his time at LSU.  The pictures I made that day ended up being displayed millions of times when people logged into their March Madness bracket choices.

After the green screen, Shaq took us to his three story closet.  Yes, you read that correct.  His closet is three stories.  Above, Shaq exited the closet wearing his favorite outfit.

It was great to photograph the big man, and I hope to do it again soon.

Shaq for Dove Men + Care

Carter Oosterhouse

Carter OosterhouseI got a call to be the still photographer on the HGTV show “Million Dollar Rooms” hosted by Carter Oosterhouse in Geneva, Florida.

The Danville Bed and Breakfast in Geneva, Florida hosted the show and featured their airplane hangar, city, pub, runway, entertainment center, movie screen, planes, cars, photo booth and massive garage door.  Here’s a video teaser of the show on Youtube.

The ladies at Danville were excited to learn that none other than Carter Oosterhouse would be hosting a show at their place.  Sally Bush guided Oosterhouse across the properties many features.  Property owner “Mayor” Dan Shaw took Oosterhouse for a ride in a Piper J3 and also fired assault rifles on the property.

Everyone had a great time on the shoot!  Check out the show!

Banana George

"Banana" George Blair

“Banana” George Blair

Best nickname is sports.

I photographed  “Banana” George Blair for the first time when he was 90 years old in his Florida home.    Banana George was born on January 22, 1915.  He wore many hats, but to me will always be known as a barefoot waterskier.

Banana George and his wife JoAnne welcomed me into their home in 2005.  I set up a yellow background in their yellow garage after they pulled out their yellow car.  I had Mr. Blair put on a yellow suit, and he sat on a yellow chair.  After the shoot, Mr. Blair showed me his yellow boat garage, which was storing his yellow boat.  Waterski magazine published several photos from the shoot.

A few years later, I photographed Mr. Blair for Boating magazine.  They were doing a story about crazy people in the boating industry.  They featured Mr. Blair, well, because he was in his 90’s and still barefoot waterskiing!  I had Mr. Blair sit on a yellow chair, overlooking his yellow boat, yellow boathouse and yellow wind sock on the lake.  Since he was a barefooter, I had him take off his yellow shoes.  He was wearing yellow pants, yellow shirt, yellow hat and yellow tinted glasses!  He was also wearing a Mayor of Cypress Gardens button, yellow of course.  I lit the scene with a Profoto 7B and softbox.

I asked Mr. Blair for an estimate on how many bananas he thinks he’s eaten in his life.  He responded with 25,000.

That’s a lot of yellow.

Best DSLR Camera

best dslr cameraBeing a photographer, I get asked all the time, “What’s the best dslr camera I should buy?”

I never give a specific answer.  I only ask questions.

How much do you want to spend?

Do you realize how big and bulky a DSLR is compared to a point and shoot?

What do you want to photograph with this new camera?

Budget is a big topic when it comes to purchasing your DSLR.  You need to consider the actual camera body, a lens or two, flash, compact flash or SD cards, a bag to carry it all, tripod, and extra storage on your home computer or external drive.  Another thing to consider is depreciation.  Cameras these days are like cars or computers, they will not hold their value.  As soon as you drive if off the lot, it’s worth less.  Professional DSLR’s can reach $7000 and entry level cameras start at $500. A dslr camera that I purchased for $4600 in 2009 is now worth about $1400 in 2013.

If you’re looking to make most of your pictures outside, in bright daylight, then a camera kit is probably a good option.  Kits come with “slow” lenses, with a maximum aperture of 4.5 or 5.6.  If you’d like to make some pictures inside a darker room, for example a recital or sports game, you need a faster aperture, such as 2.8, 2 or 1.8.  A great lens is a 50mm 1.8.  It’s fast and affordable.

There are many great entry level DSLR cameras out there to fit any budget.  I tell friends to visit their favorite big box retail store to experience different cameras.  Some may feel great in your hands, but the buttons don’t make any sense.  Or vice versa.  It’s a personal preference.  I can tell you that the new dslr cameras these days are so good, that an amateur photographer won’t notice the small nuances in megapixels, speed or image quality.

Once you’ve been in the big box stores and have decided on a camera, double check with the online retailers.  One of my favorites is http://www.samys.com in Los Angeles.  I also like http://www.bhphotovideo.com.   Sometimes a store like Walmart, Target or Costco will have the best deal.

Good luck!

Find photographer Cy Cyr on twitter or Instagram @sportsphotographer

 

 

 

 

Ian Poulter

Ryder Cup.  Match Play.  No Majors.  Crazy Hair.  Bright clothes.

That’s about what I knew about Ian Poulter before my Golf Channel assignment with him.  I now know that he’s a family man, and willing to do anything to win.  Anything.  He’s a breath of fresh air in the arena of politically correct lameness.  He tells it like it is.  He’s going to step on someone’s throat if it means winning his first major.  Golf Channel host Holly Sonders and Poulter played a few holes at Lake Nona in Orlando in the afternoon.  They even had a friendly competition at a sand trap.  Tune in for that!

After working with Poulter, I contacted several friends and said I’ll be rooting for him to win an elusive major moving forward.  The dude is a bad ass.

It was also Poulter’s birthday on the day of filming.  The thankful Golf Channel crew brought the Ryder Cup hero a cake to celebrate his big day.  We all had a piece after we wrapped for the day.

Follow photographer Cy Cyr on Instagram @sportsphotographer

Orlando Videographer

Still Photographer

To me, being a still photographer on a video production means one thing:  Stay the hell out of the way, and do your job.

Being a set photographer is a challenge.  You’ll immediately recognize that you  are not the priority, which is difficult for most photographers to fathom. You need to stay out of the way of the video crew, make little noise, and deliver terrific photos.  Some of the normal angles you’re used to working from are most likely occupied by a videographer and audio guy.

Still photographers really need to speak up on set to get their needs fulfilled.  A set photographer may need a selection of portraits in each filming location.  If you don’t speak up, people will cruise on to the next location or scene.  You’ll want to work quickly.  Have a plan in place  to execute your ideas.

The photo above is a Golf Channel show with Hall of Fame golfer Raymond Floyd at Old Palm Golf Course in Palm Beach.  Two cameras on a tripod (one is also in background) and a camera on a jib.  If I remember correctly, Mr. Floyd was delivering lines into the camera during this particular set up.  You’ll also notice a lighting crew member holding a stand, which already has 10+ sandbags.  What you don’t see is many more crew members, consisting of jib operators, producers, director, makeup, audio, wardrobe, PA’s and grips.

Still photographers don’t usually show up when the crew does.  They spend hours setting up their cameras, scouting, calibrating and lighting.  I often get a call sheet, and my call time is 1 – 2 hours after the crew.  Let me be the first to tell you that you’ll be made fun of when showing up at 7am, when the video crew was there at 5.  I’d share my favorite come backs when this happens, but it’s best for you to learn on your own in this situation.

Here’s another tip:  Don’t mess with lunch!  Talent get cranky if they have to pose or take a few extra minutes right before their lunch break.

As a still photographer, get familiar with the lighting gear and crew.  Big productions bring in flags, scrims and generators to power their lighting.   Going back a paragraph, you’ll want to make friends with the lighting crew.  Once the crew calls “lunch” or “wrapped”, I can’t explain to you how quickly these lights shut down.  It’s milliseconds.   Make sure they know you’ll need these lights on for a few extra minutes.  They take several minutes to fire back up, and I can tell you first hand, that your subject will be GONE when they turn back on.

Which brings me to my last point.  Video crews work LONG days. They’re used to it.  Still photographers are not.  Get used to a 12 – 15 hour work day.  For a 15 hour work day, video crews may only create an hour long show.  There’s a lot of down time.

Feel free to email me any questions about being a set photographer.

follow me on instagram at :  @cycyrdotcom